Tag Archives: ambrotypes

Cased Image Inventory

I was showing my latest daguerreotype to a friend the other day and she asked me how many do I have. I hadn’t really thought about it, so I sat down today and did an inventory. I came up with

Image Type gemtype 1/9th plate 1/6th plate 1/4 plate 1/2 plate
Daguerreotype 1 1 20 6 0
Tintype 1 2 5 0 1
Ambrotype 0 2 7 2 1
Albumen 0 0 0 0 1
Total 2 5 32 8 3

for a grand total of 50 cased images.

I’ll recap as many of them as I have good scans for here. One of these days I’ll get around to re-scanning/photographing the others, which I originally posted to Facebook but not at a consistent file size.

Paris Opera albumen print
Paris Opera albumen print
Shopkeepers
Shopkeepers
Anonymous Daguerreotype, ca. 1840-1845
Anonymous Daguerreotype, ca. 1840-1845

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Daughter and Father, daguerrian locket
Daughter and Father, daguerrian locket
Anonymous young gentleman with goatee
Anonymous young gentleman with goatee
Lady with glasses, Daguerreotype, quarter plate, anonymous
Lady with glasses, Daguerreotype, quarter plate, anonymous

DavisAncestor1862Zouave76PA

Mrs. A.A. Hill, Daguerreotype
Mrs. A.A. Hill, Daguerreotype
Anonymous Gentleman in Fancy Vest
Anonymous Gentleman in Fancy Vest
Gentleman With Top Hat, dated October 15, 1849
Gentleman With Top Hat, dated October 15, 1849
Anonymous Daguerreotype, Young Girl, Hand-colored, in Half Case
Anonymous Daguerreotype, Young Girl, Hand-colored, in Half Case

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Daguerreotype, Anonymous Young Man, 1/6th Plate
Daguerreotype, Anonymous Young Man, 1/6th Plate
Fred Jones, 1861, framed black glass Ambrotype
Fred Jones, 1861, framed black glass Ambrotype
Anonymous Daguerreotype, Quarter-Plate, in half case
Anonymous Daguerreotype, Quarter-Plate, in half case
Anonymous, Daguerreotype, Couple, Charlottesville, VA
Anonymous, Daguerreotype, Couple, Charlottesville, VA
Ambrotype, Penobscot Boy, 1857
Ambrotype, Penobscot Boy, 1857
Sixth Plate Daguerreotype in Union case, anonymous lady in bonnet
Sixth Plate Daguerreotype in Union case, anonymous lady in bonnet

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Quarter-plate Daguerreotype, Gentleman in book-form case
Quarter-plate Daguerreotype, Gentleman in book-form case
Tintype, boy and his dog.
Tintype, boy and his dog.
Anonymous Gentleman. Daguerreotype, Half case.
Anonymous Gentleman. Daguerreotype, Half case.

Occupational tintype – Shopkeepers

Shopkeepers
Shopkeepers

This is an unusually packaged tintype of three shopkeepers, one with a broom. I have more than good reason to suspect that the image is not original to the packet in which it resides – the packet itself is very oddly assembled, with the brass frame in four separate sections held together by a strangely still elastic string.The packet itself consists of the cover glass, the brass passepartout, the tintype, and a very thick backing glass that appears to have been blackened at one point with some kind of varnish that has faded and flaked off in spots over the intervening century and a half. The varnished back glass would suggest that it had been originally paired with a clear glass ambrotype. However, a clear glass ambrotype would have been thicker than the tintype, and the packet as is barely fits inside the brass frame. Altogether, a mystery of how this particular ensemble came to be assembled as it currently stands.

The Early Bradys

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Here are my two early Mathew Brady images. The one is a simple daguerreotype, and based on the mat style, I’d place it as an early dag – pre 1850, maybe as early as 1845. The velvet pad on the dag shows Brady’s New York studio address. I’ve also posted the ambrotype, which is a later image. This is an interesting and unusual presentation, where the image can be viewed from either side.

Three New Cased Images

My three latest acquisitions. I’ve mentioned/showed the gentleman in the book-form case before, but I have a better photo of the image itself to include now. The little milk-glass ambrotype is truly exquisite. These are in a way consolation prizes for the one that got away – I was bidding on but got outgunned on a vintage 16×21 William Henry Jackson albumen print of Bridalveil falls at Yosemite, from the days of his Denver studio (1880-1897). That was a shame; at the closing bell I could have bought it but then I’d have had to turn around and re-sell it immediately, which would have been no fun. These I get to keep as long as I like.

The Last Full Measure: Tintypes/Ambrotypes from the Civil War. Liljenquist Collection at the Library of Congress

For those who haven’t been following this, a few years ago the Liljenquist family (father and three sons) began collecting civil war cased tintypes and ambrotypes. They amassed a collection of over 700 images, of which approximately 10% have been identified. They range in size from 1/9th plate to 1/2 plate, and in subject matter from Union and Confederate soldiers to children, wives, mothers and family members in mourning, officers and enlisted and both slaves and freedmen. The collection is currently on display at the Thomas Jefferson building of the Library of Congress. Although small, the display encompasses some 300 images: some two hundred and fifty Union soldiers and their families and some fifty Confederates. One of the most striking images in the collection is the former slave and his family, a wife and two daughters, posed with him in Union uniform. It makes an interesting parallel that 150 years ago, this man was fighting for his freedom, and today, a very similar man with a very similar family sits in the White House, President of a nation radically remade by the sacrifices of that African-American soldier. Other highlights include the little girl dressed in mourning attire, holding a photo of her father who quite possibly she never knew, and the picture of the confederate soldier accompanied by a letter back home to his family describing how he died on the field of battle. A mourning necklace is also on display: the pendant is an oval gutta-percha case containing the photograph while the chain supporting it is woven of human hair, most likely from the woman who made it and whose husband is depicted inside the case.

The collection is astonishing in its scope and specificity, as well as for the collecting acumen displayed by the Liljenquist family. The family still collects at a furious pace, and so the Library has asked them to make their donations quarterly, instead of weekly as they had been doing, to give the curators time to catalog and preserve their donations. The collection in its entirety will be available online through the Library of Congress’ website in the near future.

Link to the collection: The Last Full Measure: The Liljenquist Collection at the Library of Congress

They also have the collection on display on the LoC Flickr feed entitled “Civil War Faces“. They welcome input from the general public as part of the effort to identify the subjects of the photographs.