Category Archives: Exhibitions

Alternative Photo Revolution – Kevin Kelly

Another one of our artists participating, Kevin Kelly, has been working for a long time on a series of images concerning gender and sexuality. I wanted to present a short video concerning his work here (if you pay attention, you’ll get to see the Dylan Ellis Gallery space in Toronto, where the show is going in May for the Contact festival).

Kevin Kelly GENDER PreDoc 1080p from Simon Haworth on Vimeo.

 

Alternative Photo Revolution

Glen Echo | Glen Echo Park in the Ballroom, Backroom

March 28
Viewings will be taking place from 1-9pm with a formal reception from 6-9pm. Admission: Free

New Orleans | L’Entrepot

March 31-April 1
Private reception on Friday March 31st from 6-9pm.
General admission is $10
VIP Collector ticket is $30 admission + chance to win a unique permanent print
Stay at home ticket $25 for a chance to win a unique permanent print
Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.
April 1st, viewings will be open to the public from 1-9pm. The Julia Street First Saturday event is from 6-9pm with all gallery’s in the area having receptions

Toronto | Connections Gallery

May 15-June 17
Opening May 18 from 6-9pm
The Toronto portion of the exhibition is a part of the Contact Photography Festival

#ContactPhoto #202Creates #202Fotos #acreativedc #glenechophotoworks #photoworks #altprocessrevolution #DylanEllisGallery #ConnectionsGallery #Toronto #NewOrleans #NOPA #KevinKelly

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Alternative Photo Revolution – Interview with Brittany Fleming

As some  of you may remember from my Rendering the Spirit show, I interviewed the artists participating in the show via email. For APR, I did the same. With 40 artists participating and a quick turn on the time-frame, I’m only posting a few interviews.

Today’s interview: Brittany Fleming

Tell us a bit about your photographic work: * how did you get interested in photography? 

Born and raised in rural Ontario, Brittany spent most of her adolescence outside experimenting with a camera. It was during a three-month backpacking trip to Europe that her interest in travel and photography was sparked. “Being able to combine my passion for travel with photography opened up a new way of thinking. I came back to Canada knowing what I wanted to do.” 

Leaving Fergus behind, Brittany left for school in Ottawa where she completed a two- year photography program at Algonquin College. Before graduating, she started her career as a Lifestyle Photographer with Union Eleven, where she currently works. 

* what kind of work do you produce (how would you categorize your work)? 

I currently work for a studio in Ottawa, Union Eleven where I`m a lifestyle photographer. The work I show for galleries is my Street photography & Photojournalism. 

* what themes or subjects inspire you? 

I am currently working on three projects that are close to my heart. The first is about urban development and the ever changing cityscape. I document this environment through street photography. The second is an ongoing project about agriculture – showcasing farmers from our past, present, and the future of farming through a photojournalistic lens. Lastly, I am combining street photography and photojournalism to bring light to the human rights issues of our time, specifically women’s rights. 

How do you see your work in relationship to the larger art world:

* did you come to photography from another medium?

no

* do you feel your work is influenced by other media/periods/genres? If so, which ones, and why? 

On backpacking trips I was able to connect with locals. I have the ability to connect the camera to the heart, to feel the subjects and their story. An anthropologist at heart, my aim is to show the social landscape of my time. Deriving my photographic influences from Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand, and Lee Friedlander, I always try to keep the human condition in focus. 

Could you talk a bit about the piece you submitted to the APR show? 

We all want to feel equal. My work is strongly influenced by this innate desire, and I’ve chosen to expose it through a female perspective. 

Captured in this photo are a group of people at the women rights march. Showing the young girls looking up to their mothers sparked a strong emotion. Thinking about this young girl, her past, present and, future. 

I too, yearn to feel accepted and equal. My hope, by sharing this image, is to show how truly brave these women are and how grateful they are for their rights and freedoms. We all have the power to go ahead and face our fears, follow our passions, and do so with grace. Our successes and failures are what will shape the generations of tomorrow. 

What is your experience with analog photography? Digital photography? 

When i was in school for photography we uses 4×5 cameras. Other then that I primarily shoot with my DSLR. 

Do you normally print your own work, or have others print for you? 

Bob and the team at Alternative Photo Services do an amazing job at printing my work for me. They are experts at bringing my images to life. 

Have you ever worked in alternative processes before? 

No this will be my first time 

 Brittany Fleming

Glen Echo | Glen Echo Park in the Ballroom, Backroom

March 28
Viewings will be taking place from 1-9pm with a formal reception from 6-9pm. Admission: Free

New Orleans | L’Entrepot

March 31-April 1
Private reception on Friday March 31st from 6-9pm.
General admission is $10
VIP Collector ticket is $30 admission + chance to win a unique permanent print
Stay at home ticket $25 for a chance to win a unique permanent print
Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.
April 1st, viewings will be open to the public from 1-9pm. The Julia Street First Saturday event is from 6-9pm with all gallery’s in the area having receptions

Toronto | Connections Gallery

May 15-June 17
Opening May 18 from 6-9pm
The Toronto portion of the exhibition is a part of the Contact Photography Festival

#ContactPhoto #202Creates #202Fotos #acreativedc #glenechophotoworks #photoworks #altprocessrevolution #DylanEllisGallery #ConnectionsGallery #Toronto #NewOrleans #NOPA

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Alternative Photo Revolution – Artists

As a follow-up to my previous announcement about Alternative Photo Revolution, I wanted to post a list of the participating artists. One of the conceits of the show is that virtually all work presented will be printed by Bob Carnie, an internationally recognized photo printer and master craftsman. Bob has been in the forefront of experimenting with bridging the gap between digital and wet-darkroom technologies. He was the first person to take a Durst Lambda enlarger (a digital enlarger that was designed to make traditional C-prints from digital files) and use it to produce enlarged negatives on Ortho film. Bob has used this technique to make the required negatives for alternative process prints from sources as diverse as in-camera 4×5 sheet film to iPhone digital files.

Participating in the show is a bit of a leap of faith and trust in Bob’s creative vision and talent, as none of the participants will have seen their final prints before they hang in the gallery (Bob has been kept extremely busy producing, mounting and matting 40 images for the show in addition to running his lab). Some of the artists in the show are long-time alternative process workers, like myself, and others have only worked digitally, and never printed their own work.

Here is the list of artists and their organizations/locations.

Gallery 44: Alexis Jackson

Seneca IDP: Kin Lon Ma

Photoworks: Scott Davis

New Orleans Photo Alliance: David Armentor

Toronto: Marc Betsworth, Tamiko Winters, Paul Taborovsky, Kevin Kelly, Alan Dunlop, Lisa Murzin, Ron Erwin, John Migicovsky, Evan Dion, Salina Kassam, Philip Jessup, Marlene Hilton Moore, Juli Lyons, Skip Dean, Thomas Brasch, Matthew Plexman, Laura Paterson, Bob Carnie, Monica Glitz

St Thomas: Jeff Suchak

Quebec: Hugues Rochette, Jean Lauzon, Madeleine Marcil, Claude Dagenais, Guy Lafontaine, Mirabelle Ricard, Guy Glorieux

Ottawa: Brittany Fleming

Saskatoon: Jennifer Crane

Vancouver: Brendan Meadows

Seattle: Andrej Gregov

Texas: Larry Hayden

New York: Bryan Helm

The following three artists are supplying their own prints for this show:

Ginette Clément (Quebec)- Lumen Silver Gelatin

Stephen McNeill (Toronto)- Silver Gelatin Photogram

David Christensen (Calgary)- Silver Gelatin

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Glen Echo | Glen Echo Park in the Ballroom, Backroom

March 28
Viewings will be taking place from 1-9pm with a formal reception from 6-9pm. Admission: Free

New Orleans | L’Entrepot

March 31-April 1
Private reception on Friday March 31st from 6-9pm.
General admission is $10
VIP Collector ticket is $30 admission + chance to win a unique permanent print
Stay at home ticket $25 for a chance to win a unique permanent print
Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.
April 1st, viewings will be open to the public from 1-9pm. The Julia Street First Saturday event is from 6-9pm with all gallery’s in the area having receptions

Toronto | Connections Gallery

May 15-June 17
Opening May 18 from 6-9pm
The Toronto portion of the exhibition is a part of the Contact Photography Festival

#ContactPhoto #202Creates #202Fotos #acreativedc #glenechophotoworks #photoworks #altprocessrevolution #DylanEllisGallery #ConnectionsGallery #Toronto #NewOrleans #NOPA

 

 

Alternative Photo Revolution Show

I’m thrilled to announce the upcoming Alternative Photo Revolution show, which I have been assisting and coordinating to bring to Glen Echo Park later this month.

What is the Alternative Photo Revolution?

Combining contemporary photography with historical photo printmaking processes, the Alternative Photo Revolution (APR) is one of a kind. This group show features works by photographers from across North America, printed by internationally recognized master printer Bob Carnie. Hitting the road at the end of March, APR will be popping up in Glen Echo, Maryland then New Orleans, Louisiana before returning home to the Connections Gallery in Toronto, Canada for inclusion in the Contact Photo Festival from May 15-June 17. APR seeks to use the burgeoning trend of pop-up galleries and shows to broaden the awareness and appeal of historic photographic techniques. The one-day pop-up will be at Glen Echo Park in the Back Ballroom of the Spanish Ballroom building, and will be open from 1-9pm. A number of the artists represented will be in attendance at the wine and cheese reception from 6-9pm. The APR show at Glen Echo is co-sponsored by Glen Echo Photoworks, which is celebrating its 42nd year of providing outstanding photographic education and exhibitions.

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Alternative Photo Revolution
Glen Echo Park, Maryland-Ballroom Backroom | March 28 | 1-9pm
New Orleans | L’Entrepot | 527 Julia Street | March 31 6-9pm & April 1 1-9pm Toronto | Connections Gallery | 1840 Danforth Ave | May 15-June 17 Opening May 18 6-9pm

KeyBridgeFlagsPinhole.jpg

Photo © Scott Davis, 2016 4×5 Travelwide pinhole, 65mm fl, platinum print.

Roman Panoramas – Miniature Platinum Prints

After printing a few of these panoramas from Rome, I was so taken by the intimacy of the miniature format of the 2 1/4″ x 4 1/4″ contact print, I went and made a whole series of them. I’m at fourteen of them now, but that number will fluctuate a little as I finish printing and edit down from there. I’m going to go out shooting this weekend and make some more images in the format and perhaps build a full show’s worth.

Columns, Marble Floor, Trajan's Market
Columns, Marble Floor, Trajan’s Market

I took the portfolio to the Sunday morning critique we have at Glen Echo, and instead of presenting them as raw prints, I matted them with 8-ply mats with oversize margins (11×14 inch mat boards, so roughly 4-6 inch margins around the 2 1/4 x 4 1/4 inch window). I also cut the windows such that all the mats could be viewed in landscape orientation regardless of whether the image was in portrait or landscape orientation.

Trajan's Column, Via Fori Imperiali
Trajan’s Column, Via Fori Imperiali

Presentation is very important when considering your work. It should be the first thought on your mind when planning a show – of course you need to edit the body of work, but how it will look on the wall is just as critical to successful reception as the work itself. Good presentation will focus the viewer’s attention on the work and block out the distractions of everything else going on around it.

Temple of Antoninus and Faustina
Temple of Antoninus and Faustina

Also, if you’re at all concerned with selling your work, makes a huge difference in the sales price – poorly presented, someone would pay a poster price for an original Ansel Adams, if they bought it at all. Properly presented, your work will fetch premium prices even though nobody has really heard of you outside your own city.

Column Fragment, Imperial Forum
Column Fragment, Imperial Forum

This webpage is a prime example of the issue of presentation – showing these images here in this size on this medium is a complete and utter failure to represent the scale, quality and impact of the images. You’re looking at them on your monitor, in a size well beyond their actual physical size in reality. And because they’re scans of the prints, the paper texture is exaggerated as are any minor flaws due to the handmade nature of the prints.

Rendering The Spirit: Interview with Hendrik Faure

Could you tell me your name?
Hendrik Faure

Where are you from?
Germany

How did you get into photography as an art medium (as opposed to casual or professional use)?
I do not remember for sure, I have a darkroom since 1966 and soon was interested in fine art printing, made solarisations and lith-printing. Later I hand-coloured my still life photographs.

Which alternative processes do you practice?
copperplate photogravure following method of Talbot/Klic.

What attracted you to alternative processes in general?
Interest in photohistory and in aesthetic well composed pictures.

What drew you to the specific media you practice?
Pictorialistic photogravures in literature and museums.

How does the choice of media influence your choice of subject matter (or vice versa)?
The medium fits the message.

In today’s mobile, electronic world of instant communication and virtual sharing of images, how important is it to you to create hand-made images?
Important enough to spend three days work per print edition

Is your choice to practice alternative, hand-made photography a reaction to, a complement to, or not influenced by the world of digital media?
When I began photography, there was no digital. Later I had my first computer. It was a Tandy TRS 80 model 3 and already had a mouse. She crawled through the floppy drive slot and tragically died within. I suppose, then the mouse did not like computers. I made some stills with dead mice. This was the strongest influence of digital media to my work.

Do you incorporate digital media into your alternative process work?
Photogravures need an inter-positiv, which I make chemical-based on document-film or digital on pictorio ohp. Digital so-called full frame cameras give freehand a quality like 24x36mm film cameras on tripod, but tend to have no soul.
I use digital capture sometimes if film is not possible. In the scrap project I captured pictures as well electrical as film-based (middle-format to 8x10inch).

If so, how do you incorporate it? Is it limited to mechanical reproduction technique, or does it inform/shape/influence the content of your work?
I use digital media for inferior photowork and seldom for multimedia projects.

What role do you see for hand-made/alternative process work in the art world of today? Where do you see yourself in that world?
This may be decided some 50 years later

Scrap Yard, Winter, by Hendrik Faure
Scrap Yard, Winter, by Hendrik Faure

Curating Rendering The Spirit

If you’ve never curated a group show before, especially one with international reach, it’s hard to imagine the level of effort that goes into putting on an art exhibit. You have to put out the call for entries, manage the publicity to make sure you get enough work submitted to fill the walls even after reviewing and editing, and then handle the acceptance emails and collect the accepted work.

Oh, and be prepared for things not working out as planned. I feel extremely lucky we had only two hiccups with submitted work. One was minor – one piece of work came off its mounting in transit. With a quick email to the artist, I got his permission to open the frame and re-mount the work properly so it would present well on the wall. In the process, I also replaced the source of the problem (gummy adhesive squares that were NOT archival) with water-activated linen tape loops using acid-free wheat paste for adhesive. No artist’s work is going to be damaged by me on my watch!

The second hiccup was totally beyond anyone’s control, which is what made it so maddening. Yugo Ito’s photograph coming from Japan was shipped in plenty of time to arrive at the gallery. However, it got stuck in customs in New York for almost two weeks. There was nothing to be done but to wait, as customs is a black hole into which things enter and exit at their own pace and there is no transparency or communications possible beyond checking the tracking number on the USPS website. Creativity saved the day, though – since the actual work was not in the gallery for the opening, I took the JPEG of the work from the submission and printed it, mounting it to the wall with a sheet of glass and some L-pins. It would be represented in spirit even if not in actuality.

Once all the work has arrived, you have to plan how you’re going to hang it. You can look at JPEGs all you want, and generally gauge which artist’s works should hang next to which other artist, but the actual sequencing and spacing can’t really be figured out until you have the actual framed work in hand at the gallery. Next it’s measure, measure, measure, and then plan, and re-measure, before driving the first nail into the wall. Having gallery interns to help with the hanging makes life so much easier (Shout-out to my interns! Thank you!!).

Now the work is all hung, you can relax, right? NO. Then it’s plan the reception, send out the invites, send out the press releases, buy too much cheese and crackers at Costco, and then throw a party. There’s the curator’s remarks to prepare, and handouts about the work to write. Oh, and blogging about it all the while!

At some point during the show, ideally right after you’ve hung the work but before the public comes in to see it, you document the exhibit. Below are a few excerpts from the show as hung. One of the great challenges of curating a show is that once you have it up on the wall, what might look good in the space presents a wicked challenge to document. Trying to photograph pieces in corners where you can’t get a light on them from the other side means that you’ll either have dramatic falloff in the scene from one side to the other, or you’ll have a hideous reflection of your umbrella or other diffuser in the picture glass. I opted for a bit of falloff rather than reflections where possible because the falloff can be compensated for to a degree in Photoshop – a big blinding white reflection of an umbrella cannot.

Atalie Brown
Atalie Brown
Barbara Maloney
Barbara Maloney
Bruce Schultz
Bruce Schultz
Eddie Hirschfield
Eddie Hirschfield
Erik Larsen
Erik Larsen
Ian Leake
Ian Leake
Marek Matusz
Marek Matusz
Yugo Ito
Yugo Ito

You’re not done until the show is over, the work taken down, and the artists have picked up their work or you’ve shipped it off to hither and yon. Then you get to relax for a day or two, and if you’re a busy curator, it’s back to the process all over again!