Category Archives: Upcoming Shows

INDELIBLE show- Gallery O on H Opening February 22, 6-10pm

I am overjoyed to announce that I will be one of five artists participating in INDELIBLE: That Which Cannot Be Erased, at Gallery O on H, 1354 H Street NE, Washington DC, from February 22 to the end of May. I will have over 40 palladium prints in the show. I also want to give a huge round of applause to Mary Ellen Vehlow, the owner of Gallery O on H and curator of this show, for including my work in a very powerful exhibit.

INDELIBLE: that which cannot be erased. A multimedia two-floor installation curated by Gallery Director Dolly Vehlow of GalleryOonH and Busboys and Poets Arts Curator Carol Rhodes Dyson.

Opening Reception: February 22nd 6-10pm. On exhibit through May 2019. Daily Tuesday 5-7:30PM, Wed-Fri 12-5PM, Saturday 11-3PM.

Indelible: that which cannot be erased is a confrontation of an unjust and repetitive history. The works in this exhibition seek to highlight a narrative often overlooked by mainstream art history to illustrate a continuum of injustice in our nation, featuring artists working in its capital city. Inspired by Black History Month, the show seeks to focus on the cyclical nature of unresolved issues–from the legacy of slavery to modern day police overreach and violence. The works included are a visual embodiment of current events, linked to a sinister history of oppression. Indelible puts local artists to the forefront, selected to underline the long history of racial inequality within our collective past and contemporary society. Artists featured include Milton Bowens, Billy Colbert, Scott Davis, Nehemiah Dixon, Justyne Fischer and Rodney “BUCK!” Herring.

The DC Yacht Club, site of the former docks for the city where in 1848, the Pearl, a merchant ship, had been hired by a group of slaves desiring to escape to the north. The so-called Pearl Incident was the largest non-violent slave escape in US history prior to the Civil War. Seventy-seven individuals had arranged passage. They were betrayed by a fellow slave who did not participate in the escape. The owner of several of the slaves, a Mr. Dodge, sent a steam launch to pursue them down the Potomac. The Pearl had become becalmed near the mouth of the Potomac and was caught by the steam launch. Among the passengers were two of the Edmonson daughters mentioned in the previous caption. In the immediate aftermath of the incident, pro-slavery groups ran amok in Washington DC, attacking abolitionist newspapers and groups. The long-term outcome was that the slave trade was banned outright in Washington DC in 1850, although slavery remained legal in the District until April 16, 1862.

My artists statement about the work:

Roland Barthes wrote of how a photograph contains a “punctum”, an element that strikes the viewer to the spiritual core, something that provokes a visceral emotional reaction in them. I believe life has moments of punctum – the origins of this project, for me, was an experience that ran through me like a lightning bolt. I was taking a Civil War history tour through the Smithsonian one late summer afternoon. I was standing on the lawn of L’Hermitage, a farm just outside Frederick, Maryland. I was looking around at the gently rolling hills, trees full of green leaves, puffy white clouds dotting the sky, corn in the adjacent field taller than my head, and listening to the guide talking about the history of the place.

The “bachelor’s house” at L’Hermitage on the Monocacy National Battlefield. This house would have housed the young un-married male members of the family and their personal servants. Four to six people at a time would have lived here. In the field adjacent, just out of the field of view of this photograph, the three slave cabins for L’Hermitage were located. Each of those three cabins were not much bigger than this cottage but held roughly thirty people each.

The farm was founded by a family of French emigres from Haiti who had fled the slave uprisings in the 1790s. They re-settled in Frederick, Maryland, and proceeded to attempt to reestablish Haitian-style slavery replete with the same degree of brutality they had practiced before. These people were so brutal with their slaves that their neighbors, slave-owners themselves, called the sheriff on them multiple times. In 1810, the importation of new slaves into the United States was made illegal. After that time, if you wanted more slaves, you had to buy them from someone else, or you could breed them. This family ran a stud service with their slaves, treating human beings as breeding stock.

The stone barn at L’Hermitage. The family that built the estate were originally from northern France, and so built their barn in the style of construction they remembered from their home. This would have housed their animals such as horses and cattle, along with carriages or other farm equipment like plows or threshing equipment for wheat.

Hearing this, I was struck by the horrific irony of the pastoral idyll of the scene I was viewing being literally soaked in the blood of other human beings who had lived, worked, and died there quite possibly never able to look at that scenery with the innocence I had looked at it until the moment before that revelation. I felt compelled to respond to that epiphany artistically, because I knew from my own experience that all the academic reading in the world does not adequately convey that emotional truth I had experienced.

View of the US Capitol from the approximate location of the Capitol Hotel. The Capitol Hotel served as a slave market and slave auction site, and advertised in local newspapers that their holding cells in the basement were sufficiently secure that should a slave owner suffer a loss of property while staying at the hotel, they would be fully insured against the loss.

I grew up with a very specific version of the history of this country – it was built by great men of lofty ideals, who imbued it with a progressive spirit intended to raise up the dignity of all humans. As a child, and into my adulthood, I went to the houses of these great men to see the way they lived and the places that inspired them to deliver the great nation of the United States into being. We went to Mount Vernon, Monticello, and Montpelier in Virginia, the Paca house in Annapolis, Maryland, the Carroll estates in Baltimore, and dozens of other colonial-era grand homes – their grandness was signaled as direct proof of their virtue and wisdom.

The Mount Vernon mansion. Home to George Washington, first president of the United States, an extraordinarily wealthy man, and whose profits were built almost entirely upon a large slave labor force (over 300 persons) required to manage the agriculture and industry on his 3000+ acres. Look upon this house and remember that this nation was not only founded by slave owners, it was built by slave labor and the profits of slave industry.

It was never discussed that they had the wealth and leisure to develop these lofty ideas because they owned in some cases hundreds of their fellow human beings who labored for them to produce that wealth and leisure. Nor was it discussed that these men who wrote so eloquently about the inalienable rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness saw fit to administer corporal punishment to the people they owned when those people decided that they too were deserving of the same life, liberty and happiness their owners wrote about.

A reconstructed slave cabin at Mount Vernon. This is typical of what the average enslaved worker would have lived in – log and mud construction, no glass in the very small window, poor ventilation, and two rooms (one under the roof, one on the main floor) shared by an entire family, perhaps two.

I still go to see those great houses because I am fascinated by the styles and architecture of bygone eras, but now I think about how they were paid for (and often built) with slave labor. It is a metaphoric and literal foundation to this country that we must acknowledge and recognize if we are ever going to make forward progress.

The landing from the Patuxent River at Sotterly Plantation, in southern Maryland near St. Mary’s City. At this location in 1729, a cargo of 220-plus people were delivered to the owner of Sotterly, George Plater, to be transported overland to St. Mary’s City where they would be auctioned off and he would receive a commission from the sale. This is one of five documented “Middle Passage” sites in Maryland and the first to have a memorial marker.

I chose to produce these images the way I have for two reasons. I made them as compact contact prints 2 ¼ by 4 ¼ inches in size to force the viewer to engage very personally with the images, so they cannot hold themselves at arm’s length from the subject. I printed them in an historic photographic process, palladium, because using a noble metal to make jewel-like images that can only be made with extensive manual labor was a metaphorical way of repaying some of the debt to the people who without compensation or recognition built and shaped the landscapes I photographed. I hope that these images will in this way produce moments of punctum for the viewers the way they have for me.

This is the slave graveyard at Mount Vernon. There are believed to be between 50-75 people to be buried here. Not a single one of their graves has even a headstone to mark their final rest, and in the Mount Vernon records, many of the slaves buried there are recorded by just a first name. No records of who was buried where in the plot exist, so it is impossible to say which graves belong to which individuals.

 

Come see INDELIBLE.

Labor Day Art Show, Glen Echo Park

Everyone-

 I want to invite you all to come see the Labor Day Art Show at Glen Echo. I have two pieces in the show, and it would be great to see you all at the opening reception on Friday, September 1st. I will be there on Friday evening to meet attendees and talk about my work. I’m showing two of my miniature prints from Rome. Each print is made using the historic platinum/palladium photographic process that requires preparation of the paper by hand, applying the light-sensitive metal salts (in this case palladium) with a brush, then sandwiching the negative with the sensitized paper and exposing it to a UV-rich light source to form the image, and then processing the print in a series of chemical baths to develop and make the photograph permanent.
Platinum/palladium printing was developed in the 1870s as another alternative to silver-based processes. It peaked in popularity in the early 1900s, but fell out after 1917 when world supply of platinum dropped in the aftermath of the Russian Revolution (Russia was at the time the world’s largest producer of platinum). It is notable not only for the extremely long tonal range it provides, but also its long-term stability and permanence. With a properly processed print, your platinum/palladium photograph will last as long as the paper it’s printed on lasts.
All work is for sale, and people come to this show to buy, so if you see something you like, don’t hesitate, or it may not be available when you turn around. This is a great show to support local artists, as park takes only a small commission, and 100% of the commissions go to support Glen Echo Park, which is a truly unique gem in the National Capital Region.
Exhibition Dates: Saturday, September 2 – Monday, September 4, 12 – 6 pm
Public Opening Reception: Friday, September 1, 7:30 – 9 pm
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Spanish Ballroom, Glen Echo Park 
7300 MacArthur Blvd, Glen Echo MD 20812
The 47th Annual Labor Day Art Show at Glen Echo Park will be held in the historic Spanish Ballroom from Saturday, September 2 through Monday, September 4, 2017 from 12 pm – 6 pm each day.
Sponsored by the Glen Echo Park Partnership for Arts and Culture, the
exhibition and sale runs from 12 pm to 6 pm each day. Admission is free.
The exhibition features the work of more than 200 artists from the mid-Atlantic region. The show includes works in a wide range of artistic media, including:
• sculpture
• painting and drawing
• ceramics
• glass
• jewelry
• fiber arts
• photography
• furniture
• works on paper
Public Opening Reception
Friday, September 1, from 7:30 pm to 9 pm
Spanish Ballroom
Light refreshments

Alternative Photo Revolution – Alan Dunlop

Alan Dunlop

I sent interview questions out to a number of the Alt Process Revolution artists. Artists, being artists, don’t always respond in exactly the way you expect 🙂 So I didn’t get answers to my questions in a literal, 1:1 response, but here is the photo of Alan Dunlop and his bio/response.

My name is Alan Dunlop. I currently live in Toronto, Ontario.

Photography has always been a part of my life. I remember my dad taking photographs with his Rolleiflex and watching him develop prints in the closet of our tiny apartment. I wasn’t hooked, however, until I was studying advertising art and one of my teachers handed me a camera to experiment with. I eventually became a news photographer and worked for a number of local papers for more than two decades.

In my personal work, I always like to push the limits of photography and explore new perspectives and alternative realities. Over the past decade, my focus has been on collaged images. My work is influenced by my background in technical illustration and advertising art. I am also inspired by the works of contemporary artists David Hockney and Robert Birmelin. I am especially fascinated by how these two artists blend multiple images together to elicit a sense of movement and space to convey the myriad complexities of a single moment in time.

The image I submitted to the APR show is from a series of self-portraits shot over several months exploring reflections. It was created in camera, not Photoshop.

I grew up with film and spent many hours in the darkroom. The move to digital photography was an exciting one which I embraced wholeheartedly. I now work only in digital and do my own printing. The immediacy of digital allows me to explore and create images in a way that film never could and gives me more control over the final results.

After becoming familiar with Bob Carnie’s approach to alternative processes, I was curious to learn more. I am drawn to the richness of the images created using this method. I have spent time with Bob processing a number of images, including some of my own, using alternative processes.  The results were quite intriguing. The alternative process prints have a uniqueness of their own and have a very tactile feeling about them. I am curious to see how this will work with more of my own photos.

Alternative Photo Revolution – Kevin Kelly

Another one of our artists participating, Kevin Kelly, has been working for a long time on a series of images concerning gender and sexuality. I wanted to present a short video concerning his work here (if you pay attention, you’ll get to see the Dylan Ellis Gallery space in Toronto, where the show is going in May for the Contact festival).

Kevin Kelly GENDER PreDoc 1080p from Simon Haworth on Vimeo.

 

Alternative Photo Revolution

Glen Echo | Glen Echo Park in the Ballroom, Backroom

March 28
Viewings will be taking place from 1-9pm with a formal reception from 6-9pm. Admission: Free

New Orleans | L’Entrepot

March 31-April 1
Private reception on Friday March 31st from 6-9pm.
General admission is $10
VIP Collector ticket is $30 admission + chance to win a unique permanent print
Stay at home ticket $25 for a chance to win a unique permanent print
Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.
April 1st, viewings will be open to the public from 1-9pm. The Julia Street First Saturday event is from 6-9pm with all gallery’s in the area having receptions

Toronto | Connections Gallery

May 15-June 17
Opening May 18 from 6-9pm
The Toronto portion of the exhibition is a part of the Contact Photography Festival

#ContactPhoto #202Creates #202Fotos #acreativedc #glenechophotoworks #photoworks #altprocessrevolution #DylanEllisGallery #ConnectionsGallery #Toronto #NewOrleans #NOPA #KevinKelly

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Alternative Photo Revolution – Interview with Brittany Fleming

As some  of you may remember from my Rendering the Spirit show, I interviewed the artists participating in the show via email. For APR, I did the same. With 40 artists participating and a quick turn on the time-frame, I’m only posting a few interviews.

Today’s interview: Brittany Fleming

Tell us a bit about your photographic work: * how did you get interested in photography? 

Born and raised in rural Ontario, Brittany spent most of her adolescence outside experimenting with a camera. It was during a three-month backpacking trip to Europe that her interest in travel and photography was sparked. “Being able to combine my passion for travel with photography opened up a new way of thinking. I came back to Canada knowing what I wanted to do.” 

Leaving Fergus behind, Brittany left for school in Ottawa where she completed a two- year photography program at Algonquin College. Before graduating, she started her career as a Lifestyle Photographer with Union Eleven, where she currently works. 

* what kind of work do you produce (how would you categorize your work)? 

I currently work for a studio in Ottawa, Union Eleven where I`m a lifestyle photographer. The work I show for galleries is my Street photography & Photojournalism. 

* what themes or subjects inspire you? 

I am currently working on three projects that are close to my heart. The first is about urban development and the ever changing cityscape. I document this environment through street photography. The second is an ongoing project about agriculture – showcasing farmers from our past, present, and the future of farming through a photojournalistic lens. Lastly, I am combining street photography and photojournalism to bring light to the human rights issues of our time, specifically women’s rights. 

How do you see your work in relationship to the larger art world:

* did you come to photography from another medium?

no

* do you feel your work is influenced by other media/periods/genres? If so, which ones, and why? 

On backpacking trips I was able to connect with locals. I have the ability to connect the camera to the heart, to feel the subjects and their story. An anthropologist at heart, my aim is to show the social landscape of my time. Deriving my photographic influences from Robert Frank, Diane Arbus, Walker Evans, Garry Winogrand, and Lee Friedlander, I always try to keep the human condition in focus. 

Could you talk a bit about the piece you submitted to the APR show? 

We all want to feel equal. My work is strongly influenced by this innate desire, and I’ve chosen to expose it through a female perspective. 

Captured in this photo are a group of people at the women rights march. Showing the young girls looking up to their mothers sparked a strong emotion. Thinking about this young girl, her past, present and, future. 

I too, yearn to feel accepted and equal. My hope, by sharing this image, is to show how truly brave these women are and how grateful they are for their rights and freedoms. We all have the power to go ahead and face our fears, follow our passions, and do so with grace. Our successes and failures are what will shape the generations of tomorrow. 

What is your experience with analog photography? Digital photography? 

When i was in school for photography we uses 4×5 cameras. Other then that I primarily shoot with my DSLR. 

Do you normally print your own work, or have others print for you? 

Bob and the team at Alternative Photo Services do an amazing job at printing my work for me. They are experts at bringing my images to life. 

Have you ever worked in alternative processes before? 

No this will be my first time 

 Brittany Fleming

Glen Echo | Glen Echo Park in the Ballroom, Backroom

March 28
Viewings will be taking place from 1-9pm with a formal reception from 6-9pm. Admission: Free

New Orleans | L’Entrepot

March 31-April 1
Private reception on Friday March 31st from 6-9pm.
General admission is $10
VIP Collector ticket is $30 admission + chance to win a unique permanent print
Stay at home ticket $25 for a chance to win a unique permanent print
Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.
April 1st, viewings will be open to the public from 1-9pm. The Julia Street First Saturday event is from 6-9pm with all gallery’s in the area having receptions

Toronto | Connections Gallery

May 15-June 17
Opening May 18 from 6-9pm
The Toronto portion of the exhibition is a part of the Contact Photography Festival

#ContactPhoto #202Creates #202Fotos #acreativedc #glenechophotoworks #photoworks #altprocessrevolution #DylanEllisGallery #ConnectionsGallery #Toronto #NewOrleans #NOPA

AltProRevSponsors

Alternative Photo Revolution – Artists

As a follow-up to my previous announcement about Alternative Photo Revolution, I wanted to post a list of the participating artists. One of the conceits of the show is that virtually all work presented will be printed by Bob Carnie, an internationally recognized photo printer and master craftsman. Bob has been in the forefront of experimenting with bridging the gap between digital and wet-darkroom technologies. He was the first person to take a Durst Lambda enlarger (a digital enlarger that was designed to make traditional C-prints from digital files) and use it to produce enlarged negatives on Ortho film. Bob has used this technique to make the required negatives for alternative process prints from sources as diverse as in-camera 4×5 sheet film to iPhone digital files.

Participating in the show is a bit of a leap of faith and trust in Bob’s creative vision and talent, as none of the participants will have seen their final prints before they hang in the gallery (Bob has been kept extremely busy producing, mounting and matting 40 images for the show in addition to running his lab). Some of the artists in the show are long-time alternative process workers, like myself, and others have only worked digitally, and never printed their own work.

Here is the list of artists and their organizations/locations.

Gallery 44: Alexis Jackson

Seneca IDP: Kin Lon Ma

Photoworks: Scott Davis

New Orleans Photo Alliance: David Armentor

Toronto: Marc Betsworth, Tamiko Winters, Paul Taborovsky, Kevin Kelly, Alan Dunlop, Lisa Murzin, Ron Erwin, John Migicovsky, Evan Dion, Salina Kassam, Philip Jessup, Marlene Hilton Moore, Juli Lyons, Skip Dean, Thomas Brasch, Matthew Plexman, Laura Paterson, Bob Carnie, Monica Glitz

St Thomas: Jeff Suchak

Quebec: Hugues Rochette, Jean Lauzon, Madeleine Marcil, Claude Dagenais, Guy Lafontaine, Mirabelle Ricard, Guy Glorieux

Ottawa: Brittany Fleming

Saskatoon: Jennifer Crane

Vancouver: Brendan Meadows

Seattle: Andrej Gregov

Texas: Larry Hayden

New York: Bryan Helm

The following three artists are supplying their own prints for this show:

Ginette Clément (Quebec)- Lumen Silver Gelatin

Stephen McNeill (Toronto)- Silver Gelatin Photogram

David Christensen (Calgary)- Silver Gelatin

AltProRevSponsors

Glen Echo | Glen Echo Park in the Ballroom, Backroom

March 28
Viewings will be taking place from 1-9pm with a formal reception from 6-9pm. Admission: Free

New Orleans | L’Entrepot

March 31-April 1
Private reception on Friday March 31st from 6-9pm.
General admission is $10
VIP Collector ticket is $30 admission + chance to win a unique permanent print
Stay at home ticket $25 for a chance to win a unique permanent print
Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite.
April 1st, viewings will be open to the public from 1-9pm. The Julia Street First Saturday event is from 6-9pm with all gallery’s in the area having receptions

Toronto | Connections Gallery

May 15-June 17
Opening May 18 from 6-9pm
The Toronto portion of the exhibition is a part of the Contact Photography Festival

#ContactPhoto #202Creates #202Fotos #acreativedc #glenechophotoworks #photoworks #altprocessrevolution #DylanEllisGallery #ConnectionsGallery #Toronto #NewOrleans #NOPA

 

 

Alternative Photo Revolution Show

I’m thrilled to announce the upcoming Alternative Photo Revolution show, which I have been assisting and coordinating to bring to Glen Echo Park later this month.

What is the Alternative Photo Revolution?

Combining contemporary photography with historical photo printmaking processes, the Alternative Photo Revolution (APR) is one of a kind. This group show features works by photographers from across North America, printed by internationally recognized master printer Bob Carnie. Hitting the road at the end of March, APR will be popping up in Glen Echo, Maryland then New Orleans, Louisiana before returning home to the Connections Gallery in Toronto, Canada for inclusion in the Contact Photo Festival from May 15-June 17. APR seeks to use the burgeoning trend of pop-up galleries and shows to broaden the awareness and appeal of historic photographic techniques. The one-day pop-up will be at Glen Echo Park in the Back Ballroom of the Spanish Ballroom building, and will be open from 1-9pm. A number of the artists represented will be in attendance at the wine and cheese reception from 6-9pm. The APR show at Glen Echo is co-sponsored by Glen Echo Photoworks, which is celebrating its 42nd year of providing outstanding photographic education and exhibitions.

 AltProRevSponsors

 

Alternative Photo Revolution
Glen Echo Park, Maryland-Ballroom Backroom | March 28 | 1-9pm
New Orleans | L’Entrepot | 527 Julia Street | March 31 6-9pm & April 1 1-9pm Toronto | Connections Gallery | 1840 Danforth Ave | May 15-June 17 Opening May 18 6-9pm

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Photo © Scott Davis, 2016 4×5 Travelwide pinhole, 65mm fl, platinum print.