Tag Archives: Ile St. Louis

Paris in October – part 17 – My neighborhood in Paris

Some street scenes from my neighborhood. In reflection, I wish I had taken an afternoon and just photographed up and down the street. There were so many charming little restaurants and shops along the Rue St. Louis en L’Ile, you could easily make a photo study of just that one street.

Sorza Restaurant, Ile St. Louis
Sorza Restaurant, Ile St. Louis

The Cure Gourmande candy shop was ALWAYS busy. Probably as much to do with the bright, cheery interior as it does with the candies and biscuits they sell. Who wouldn’t want to go in and browse, and maybe try a sample or two?

Cure Gorumande sweet shop, Rue St. Louis en L'Ile
Cure Gorumande sweet shop, Rue St. Louis en L’Ile

Please give me your feedback on these two – which do you like better? I’m on the fence as to which one works best.

Patrick Allain Florist, Rue St. Louis en L'Ile
Patrick Allain Florist, Rue St. Louis en L’Ile

Patrick Allain Florist
Patrick Allain Florist

This was one of the few opportunities I had to break out my Rolleinar close-up filter sets and take a picture of something small. Given the size and weight of them, even though I only used them maybe twice on the whole trip, I don’t regret bringing them, especially when you compare them to a dedicated macro lens for an SLR system. I was drawn to the different textures and colors of the wood of the door, the rusty iron of the lion head, and the painted metal of the snake. And believe it or not, this was hand-held!

Door Knocker, Ile St. Louis
Door Knocker, Ile St. Louis

In closing, here’s another restaurant/wine bar in the neighborhood, this one on the Quai de Bourbon, facing the Pont Marie. It really shows the age of the building, as nothing on it is really square or level.

Bistro Au Franc Pinot
Bistro Au Franc Pinot

Paris in October – part 16 – My home away from Home

Here are some photos I took of the apartment where we stayed. The apartment was at Number 6, Rue St. Louis en L’Ile. This was an outstanding choice of location and of apartment. It had charm, convenience, and comfort. The bedrooms were a touch petite, but it was never a problem. I would stay there again in a heartbeat. Our landlady, Francoise, was super charming and met us the day we arrived with a bottle of wine and a plate of cheeses she bought down the street at the fromagerie.

I was utterly charmed by the arrangement of this little velvet-covered chair in the dining room, next to the Chinese style sideboard.

Chair, Dining Room Window
Chair, Dining Room Window

The living room featured a chaise lounge by Le Corbusier. I suspect it is an original, based on the wear on the cowhide cover.

Le Corbusier Chaise, Living Room
Le Corbusier Chaise, Living Room

Looking out the living room window, this is the view when you look straight out.

Window, Number 6, Rue St Louis en L'Ile
Window, Number 6, Rue St Louis en L’Ile

Looking up the street on a sunny day:

Rue St. Louis in the Sun
Rue St. Louis in the Sun

And on a rainy day:

Rue St. Louis in the Rain
Rue St. Louis in the Rain

The Rue St. Louis is very busy with pedestrians all day, although it may not look as such down at my end of the street. A block further up is where the shops, art galleries, restaurants and food sellers begin.

This archway was directly across the street from our apartment, where the Rue St. Louis took a right turn to go out to the quay.

Archway, Rue St. Louis
Archway, Rue St. Louis

Even though it was raining, I stepped out on the balcony and looked down, to see this scene of the woman with red pants crossing the street:

Woman Crossing Rue St. Louis in the Rain
Woman Crossing Rue St. Louis in the Rain

Here is the Eglise St. Louis en L’Ile with its clock, up close, which you can see in the background of the sunny and rainy shots of the Rue St. Louis:

Eglise St Louis En L'Ile
Eglise St Louis En L’Ile

The église St. Louis has a gorgeous baroque interior replete with dark wood paneling, stained glass, and surprisingly enough magnificent altarpieces that somehow managed to survive the upheaval of the French Revolution. They regularly have concerts there as well as services, and it is well worth popping in if you’re passing by.

October in Paris – part 15 – A few more night photos

The Ilot Vache restaurant is on the corner of the Rue St.Louis en l’Ile and the Rue des Deux Ponts, which more or less bisects the Ile St. Louis into east and west halves. The Ile St. Louis was once actually two separate islands, one of which was the Ilot Vache (little cow island) because it was used as pastureland for Parisian cows. With the rapid growth of the city’s population in the 15th century, there was such a demand for more prime real estate that the two islands were merged into one and developed as residential space. Thus the name of the restaurant. The Rue des Deux Ponts roughly demarcates where the two islands were split. My dad and I ate dinner at L’Ilot Vache one night, and the food was quite good, even if the dining room was a bit crowded.

L'Ilot Vache Restaurant
L’Ilot Vache Restaurant

I managed to catch a pair of diners in the window of the restaurant.

Diners, L'Ilot Vache, Night
Diners, L’Ilot Vache, Night

This is one case where I broke my normal rule of shooting night photos with Portra 160 – these two were done on Ektar 100. I suspect that I had just a couple frames left on the roll of Ektar that was loaded in the camera when I set out to do my night shots, so I finished them off and then switched over to Portra for the rest of the evening.

October in Paris – part 14 – Paris by Night

Ok, it’s far from a comprehensive survey of the city by night, but whaddya want, I only had a single night for night shooting, so I confined myself to where I could walk to from my apartment.

One of the great things about where we (my father and I) stayed was the fact we were in walking distance of just about everything, from the subway to all the historical buildings and neighborhoods. Notre Dame was a stone’s throw away, across the bridge. Here is the rear view from the approach I took over the Pont St. Louis.

Notre Dame, Rear View, Night
Notre Dame, Rear View, Night

The front facade is fully illuminated at night, and they have built a set of large risers in the plaza in front that if nothing else serve as a great camera platform for photographing the towers. The night I was out shooting was the night of the full moon, so I got lucky and was able to get this shot of the tower and the moon.

Notre Dame, Tower, Full Moon
Notre Dame, Tower, Full Moon

Another view of the towers, from a side street. It had been raining that evening, so the streets were wet giving them that Hollywood movie look.

Notre Dame, Side Street, Night
Notre Dame, Side Street, Night

Another shot of the full moon, over a grand Hotel (Hotel in the Parisian sense of grand city residence/townhouse as opposed to place-where-you-rent-a-room-by-the-night) on the Ile de la Cite.

Full Moon Over Hotel, Ile de la Cite
Full Moon Over Hotel, Ile de la Cite

The Pont St. Louis, slick with rain. This is the bridge that connects the Ile St. Louis with the Ile de la Cite.

Pont St. Louis, Night
Pont St. Louis, Night

A view of the Hotel de Ville (Paris’ City Hall) from across the Seine. The white line at the river level is created by the lights of a passing river tour boat that has flood lights on the roof to illuminate the buildings on the quays as it passes. I don’t envy the people whose apartments face the river because of that, even if the boat tours do stop sometime between 9 and 10 pm.

Hotel de Ville, Seine, Night
Hotel de Ville, Seine, Night

Another view of the bridges across the Seine. In the background on the left you can see a rather castle-like building which is La Monnaie, the old French Mint where they used to make coins.

Seine Bridges, La Monnaie, Night
Seine Bridges, La Monnaie, Night

The last bridge of today’s program is the Pont Louis Phillippe, which connects the end of the Ile St. Louis to the north bank of the Seine. The bridge I used every day to get to and from the subway was the Pont Marie, which abuts the middle of the Ile St. Louis. I wanted to get a view of the bridges from water level, so I went down a set of steps on the quayside of the Ile de la Cite and set up my tripod at the very bottom – you can see from the facing set of steps they descend all the way into the water (I did not test how far down they go, as I had no desire to get wet, especially at this time of year).

Pont Louis Phillippe, Steps, Night
Pont Louis Phillippe, Steps, Night

The St. Regis cafe has a view of the Pont St. Louis. Notre Dame itself is hidden by the buildings across the bridge. On my excursion, I saw people sitting outside the cafe all evening – I returned home at nearly midnight and there were people still outside the cafe as it was closing up.

St. Regis Cafe, Night
St. Regis Cafe, Night

Here’s a look into the courtyard of one of the hotels on the Rue St. Louis en l’Ile, at number 51. I looked through the doorway, which had always been closed when I walked by in the daytime, and saw the light on in the library window on the second floor, and I just had to take that picture. I love libraries (I’m sitting in one as I type this, my modest personal library of 2000 or so books), so seeing in to one had a rather Proustian effect on me.

Hotel Courtyard, 51 Rue St. Louis en L'Ile, Night
Hotel Courtyard, 51 Rue St. Louis en L’Ile, Night

I shot all these on Kodak Portra 160 because I like how it responds to nighttime color better than Ektar. It has a less contrasty look which is good for night because night scenes are inherently contrastier than daytime scenes, and it handles overexposure better than Ektar.