Tag Archives: panoramic

Playing with Triptychs

I’ve been having so much fun lately with my photography. As it should be – it should never be WORK – it should be fun. And the Lomo Belair X/6-12 is part of the reason. Yeah, it’s lo-fi, it has a plastic fantastic lens, it’s auto-exposure with virtually no feedback (you never have any idea what shutter speed you’re using). But you’re shooting medium format panoramics! And for $250!! Where are you going to find a (useable) Brooks Veriwide or a Horseman 6×12 for $250? Even a 6×12 roll back for a 4×5 will set you back $400. So there’s a lot to like about it for the money.

And although the negatives themselves are, shall we say, less than razor-sharp, they do make awesome contact prints (witness my Roman panoramics and my recent Sinister Idyll series). This triptych was inspired by a vertical panorama series I saw someone else do. Theirs was a landscape, but I thought this office/apartment/retail complex in Washington DC would make a good urban subject to try it out on.

Columbia Plaza
Columbia Plaza

Another fun experiment with my Lomo. This time a vertical panoramic triptych. I intentionally skewed the middle panel to give what is otherwise a very static subject some visual movement and dynamism.

Columbia Plaza
Columbia Plaza

DC Street Nocturne in the key of Panoramic, part 1.

Some of my prints from the shoot on Saturday night. These are all palladium prints. The images were shot with my Canham 5×12. All images were taken around Dupont Circle. You can see from the bus photo that these were obviously long time exposures (the bus was somewhere north of 2 minutes, in multiple snaps of 30+ seconds each). The bus was an experiment that didn’t produce the expected result, but in a bout of serendipity turned out something just as cool as my original concept. I was hoping the bus sitting still as passengers boarded would record as a solid object. Instead, it became something far more abstract in the final image – you can recognize the bus, in pieces. It became an essay on motion, transportation and “transit/ion” by virtue of its self-deconstruction.